Green Party Endorses Detroit Candidates

Green Party Endorses Detroit Candidates

Wayne County Greens support Mayoral, Clerk, and City Council Candidates

Wayne County, Michigan

On Tuesday, June 13th, the Wayne County Green Party officially endorsed the candidacies of Detroit Mayoral candidate, Ingrid LaFleur; City Clerk candidate, D. Etta Wilcoxon; City Council candidate for the 1st District, James Eberheart Jr; City Council candidate for the 7th District, Joanna Underwood; and City Council At Large candidate Beverly Kindle-Walker.

Continue reading

Advertisements

What is Neoliberalism?

Watching the video will be an hour well spent.

George, in the Q & A session, starts around 51 minutes:

“…and this is also a problem for Marxism. Keynes has absolutely nothing to say about the environmental crisis, which is the biggest crisis – by far – that we confront. The Keynesian fiscal stimulus accelerates the environmental crisis. Under the Keynesian vision, just as under the neoliberal vision, salvation is indistinguishable from catastrophe. Everything that is good economically is bad environmentally because you are stimulating economic growth which is the fundamental driver of environmental destruction.”

At a little over an hour, he gets into discussing the European Green Parties, and how difficult it is to distinguish their approach from that of other leftish parties. It’s something we should no doubt be working on.

Address to WSU Board of Governors 9/23

(author – Fran Shor; posted by Art Myatt)

Thank you for the opportunity to address this body. My name is Francis Shor and I am an Emeritus Professor in History at WSU. During my forty years as a faculty member here, I believe I only addressed the Board once – in 2007 when it was considering eliminating the special degree-granting program for working adults in which I taught. Unfortunately, the Board ratified, by a 6-2 vote, the very shortsighted proposal of the Administration. In the immediate aftermath, the university began losing students, ours included, and became a less accessible institution of higher learning for working adults and, also, African-Americans who had constituted a majority of students in our program and who we graduated at a much higher percentage than their younger cohorts in the traditional undergraduate programs at WSU.

However, I am not here to rehash an old mistake, but to address what is potentially a new mistake, albeit on the surface not as consequential. Continue reading

Shortchanging Michigan Adult Students

Written by Fran Shor
Posted here by Art Myatt
The September 2016 Michigan League for Public Policy report on postsecondary education in the state highlights the abysmal lack of support for adult students by the Michigan Legislature. After terminating several funding opportunities for adult learners in 2010, the state continues to exclude financial aid for those adults who have been out of high school for more than 10 years. Especially hard hit are low-income adult students who may have to contend with family responsibilities while attending college on a part-time basis.

Continue reading

Forfeiting the Future at Wayne State and other Michigan Public Universities

Fran Shor

In 2007 the Wayne State Board of Governors (BoG), at the behest of a shortsighted Administration, terminated the one department at WSU dedicated to an “open admissions” policy for working adults wishing to pursue a degree. Of the six Democrats on the BoG, four of them (including one white male union official), as well as the two Republicans, voted with the Administration, ending an internationally recognized program that began in 1973.

This disastrous decision not only shut off welcoming access to WSU for working adults, but also added to the downward spiral of student enrollment. Moreover, given WSU’s notoriously poor graduation rate for African-American students, to end a department that graduated African-American working adult students (majority women) at a much higher percentage seemed prejudicial and perverse. Also, at a time when there was a growing demand for a more educated work force, such a move seemed especially blinkered. Continue reading